Part-time Online MBA Programs

Many busy professionals consider returning to school to earn their master’s degree in business administration (MBA), but for some, the thought of devoting two years to intense full-time study is not realistic. Some cannot afford to quit their current position; others have to family members that depend on them. Even some married graduate students realize that living solely on their spouse’s income for the duration of the program is not sustainable. While this might sound discouraging, the good news is that universities that offer full-time MBA programs have noticed and responded by creating part-time and flexible MBA programs.

Business schools began offering flexible and part-time degrees as a response to declining applications for full-time MBA programs. Enrollment for two-year full-time MBA programs has dropped by 60 percent in just the past few years, according to the Graduate Management Admissions Council. As a result, schools have restructured some of their degree programs to allow students to complete an MBA degree on a part-time basis.

Some schools and students use the terms part-time and flexible interchangeably. While a part-time degree program can be part of a school’s flexible offerings, a flexible program doesn’t necessarily mean that it is part-time. For example, a program can be a full-time hybrid program, which means that the school offers flexibility with both online and in-person class options. It is important to note that most part-time MBA programs are entirely online, adding more flexibility for students already pressed for time or money.

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Professors to Know in Part-Time MBA Programs

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    Altaf Ahmad, PhD, Arizona State University

    Dr. Ahmad is a clinical assistant professor of information systems at ASU's W.P. Carey School of Business. He earned his PhD from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Prior to that, he received his MBA in Sydney, Australia from the University of Technology and his bachelor's degree from New York’s Rochester Institute of Technology. Dr. Ahmad also previously worked at Howard University in Washington, D.C. At the W.P. Carey School of Business, Dr. Ahmad has redesigned several courses and created a new bachelor's degree program in business data analytics. His primary interest areas include technology use and information privacy.

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    Goker Aydin, PhD, Johns Hopkins University

    Dr. Aydin teaches operations management and business analytics at the Carey Business School at Johns Hopkins. He holds a doctoral degree in industrial engineering from Stanford University and his primary areas of interest include dynamic pricing, operations management, quantitative methods, revenue management, and supply chain management. Dr. Aydin uses mathematical models to gain insights into the demand and supply uncertainty facing both retailers and their suppliers. He has earned many awards and contributed to multiple publications; most recently, Dr. Aydin was awarded the Kelley School MBA Class Teaching Excellence Award.

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    Cheryl Druehl, PhD, George Mason University

    Dr. Cheryl Druehl is an associate professor in operations management at George Mason's School of Business. She is also a dean's scholar thanks to her contributions in research, teaching, and service at the school. Dr. Druehl has a doctorate in business administration from Stanford University, an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh, and a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles. Her research interests include innovative contests, management of technology and innovation, new product development, sustainability, and supply chain coordination, contracts, and competition. Dr. Druehl currently serves on the editorial review board of the Journal of Operations Management and Productions and Operations Management Journal.